• Scientific name: Gallus gallus (Linnaeus, 1758)
  • Polynesian name: Mo’a oviri, taetavo : wild chicken, moa ofiri : wild hen, moa oui, moa-oni : rooster, moa vari ou moa ufa : hen, moa maia’a : mother hen, moa fa’atito : fighting cock, moa fanau’a : chicken, mouti (Society), moa (Marquesas, Rurutu)
  • Order: : Galliformes
  • Family: : Phasianidae
  • Category: Introduced Birds
  • Location: All archipelagos

Apearance and identification

50 cm. Les coqs sont facilement distingués des poules par le développement important de leur crête, de leur queue et de leurs ergots. De nombreuses colorations existent, les individus des souches les plus anciennes ont des tons rouges plus marqués.

Videos

Voice

Characteristics

The species was introduced by the first Polynesian upon arrival. Present almost everywhere in French Polynesia, except in certain volcanic islands and atolls where they have not yet been introduced.

Egg incubation for 18 to 21 days after which the chicks follow the mother for at least two months.

Lives in the wild in the forests up to 800 meters. Gregarious species, moving in groups even if accompanied by their chicks. Tends to isolate themselves in the valleys. Many domestic cocks return to the wild and live in near freedom in gardens where they are no longer hunted for their meat but brought up for a popular Polynesians hobby: cock fighting. These birds have an impressive flight capacity compared to those of the metropolis.

“Crowing” made even at night in Polynesia, cackles.

Omnivorous and opportunistic species.

Location

The species was introduced by the first Polynesian upon arrival. Present almost everywhere in French Polynesia, except in certain volcanic islands and atolls where they have not yet been introduced.

Reproduction

Egg incubation for 18 to 21 days after which the chicks follow the mother for at least two months.

Habitat

Lives in the wild in the forests up to 800 meters. Gregarious species, moving in groups even if accompanied by their chicks. Tends to isolate themselves in the valleys. Many domestic cocks return to the wild and live in near freedom in gardens where they are no longer hunted for their meat but brought up for a popular Polynesians hobby: cock fighting. These birds have an impressive flight capacity compared to those of the metropolis.

Voice

“Crowing” made even at night in Polynesia, cackles.

Food

Omnivorous and opportunistic species.

Status and protection

Introduced and not threatened.
The species is classified as “Least Concern” (LC) on the IUCN Red List.

Original text by Caroline BLANVILLAIN – Supplements and update by various members of the SOP Manu.