• Scientific Name: Pluvialis fulva (Gmelin, 1789)
  • Polynesian Names: Torea (Société et Tuamotu); ti’ofi – ti’afe (Australes)
  • Order: Charadriiformes
  • Family: Charadriidae
  • Category: Migratory Birds
  • Location:Siberia and Alaska (breeding), Whole French Polynesia

Apearance and identification

Pluvier fauve9 inches. Male and female identical in appearance. Individuals with non-breeding plumage have the top of the brown body dotted with white patches, red and fawn. The belly shades from white to beige. The head is tawny. The cap has similar colours as the one of the back. Individuals with breeding plumage have the cheeks, throat, chest and belly of the same black colour. The latter is rimmed by a thick white stripe. The legs are long with colours going from dark grey to olive grey. The beak is black and short.
Its approach is characteristic: it runs a small distance, stops abruptly, searches food on the ground and runs again very quickly.

Videos

Voice

Characteristics

Breeds from June to July in Siberia and West Alaska. From August to April, it winters in the Pacific Islands, South-West Asia, New Zealand and Australia. Visible everywhere in French Polynesia where some individuals stay all year.

Breeds from June to July in East Siberia and West Alaska but never in French Polynesia. Nests in a vaguely defined nest herbs, moss or leaves. The female lays 3 to 5 white creamed eggs with black spots, measuring an average of 48 x 33 mm.

It’s a wader species. During day time it searches for food on fields (grass meadows, lawns gardens, roadsides, soccer fields and runways) and taro fields, but also on shores and reefs exposed by the tides. These birds gather by the sea where they usually spend the night.

« tou-wit… » repeated two to three times as an alarm.

Insects, larvae and small crustaceans.

Location

Breeds from June to July in Siberia and West Alaska. From August to April, it winters in the Pacific Islands, South-West Asia, New Zealand and Australia. Visible everywhere in French Polynesia where some individuals stay all year.

Breeding

Breeds from June to July in East Siberia and West Alaska but never in French Polynesia. Nests in a vaguely defined nest herbs, moss or leaves. The female lays 3 to 5 white creamed eggs with black spots, measuring an average of 48 x 33 mm.

Habitat

It’s a wader species. During day time it searches for food on fields (grass meadows, lawns gardens, roadsides, soccer fields and runways) and taro fields, but also on shores and reefs exposed by the tides. These birds gather by the sea where they usually spend the night.

Voice

« tou-wit… » repeated two to three times as an alarm.

Food

Insects, larvae and small crustaceans.

Status and protection

The species is classified as “Least Concern” (LC) on the IUCN Red List.

Original text by Caroline BLANVILLAIN – Supplements and update by various members of the SOP Manu.